Bandes-Dessinees

I know that’s spelled wrong: there should be an accent over the second ‘e’ in ‘dessinees’, but while there’s plenty of tutorials on how to get the most use out of WordPress, I didn’t seem to come across one telling me how to add non-English characters.

Anyhow: while moving some records around in an attempt to make some space in which to walk in my record area, I uncovered some comic books I bought while in Europe.  European comic books are very different from the ones we get over here: 48 pages, full colour throughout, and hardbound.  In Europe, comic books are Art.

I tried to find links for these, but most the searches came up blank, so I’ll just write about them.

“Les Trois Cheveux Blancs” by Hausman and Yann seemed to be an allegory about hunting, told in twin tales of a redhead struggling to get out of a podunk village, and her pet vixen.

“L’Anti-Jole” (accent aigu over the ‘o’, for you Francophones), by Cabaness, was apparently an allegory on French colonialism; I didn’t realise that when I bought it, I thought it was a surrealist freakout with furries.

While also not surrealist, Tramber’s “Pas de Cadeau a Gromago” nonetheless contains many references to Dali, as it collects the futuristic adventures of a couple of part-time crooks.

“Les Lumieres de Amalou” is a huge, sprawling work, something like 300 pages, about a chase for a magician’s diary in a steampunk world populated by both humans and anthropomorphic animals.  It cost me 60 Euros, and as I look at it now I realise I didn’t finish reading it.  I’ll rectify that after I finish ‘Moby Dick’.

I never even started Crisse’s “Atalante”, so I can’t even tell you what it’s about, except that it takes place in a world based on Greek mythology.

Along with all the French comics, I found, wrapped in Sinterklaas gift paper (meaning I got them in either the Netherlands or northern Belgium, and that I probably got them on the tour where the ‘Infamous Nijmegen Sinterklaas Incident’ ocurred), two volumes of one of my favourite furry comics, Sokal’s “Canardo”.  I haven’t read them yet, but I will before bed tonight.  Okay, ‘read’ is a relative term here, as these are in Dutch, and while I CAN read French, Dutch is, alas, not one of my strong points.

Since i know there will be questions, I should probably point interested parties at this, which was the inspiration for what became the ‘Infamous Nijmegen Sinterklaas Incident’.  The smart ones amongst you will be able to figure out what happened just by listening…

I had trouble figuring out where to file this post: Uncategorised?  Reviews?  In the end, after mentioning the Nijmegen incident, I realised where it had to go…

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